Current Exhibits

Quilts of Valor

A 50 State Salute • Old Glory

October 11, 2019 - January 14, 2020

Quilts of Valor Foundation
When the Quilts of Valor Foundation (QOVF) was founded in 2003 by Catherine Roberts, its mission was to cover our nation’s military touched by war – that is, to cover them with quilts and honor their service. To do that, a team of volunteers donate their time and materials to make a quilt collaboratively. As of today, nearly 200,000 Quilts of Valor have been presented. The Quilts of Valor Foundation will present these quilts to veterans and military who have been touched by war at the presentation ceremony to be held at The National Quilt Museum on Tuesday, January 14, 2020 at 2 p.m.
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CONTEMPORÂNEO – CONTEMPORARY

A Joint Exhibition of Art Quilts from Brazil and the Contemporary Quilt Art Association

Quilt Block (R)Evolution by Barbara Fox

Quilt Block (R)Evolution by Barbara Fox

October 18, 2019- January 28, 2020

For the past nine years the Contemporary Quilt Art Association (CQA) from Washington State has been sending art quilts to the Patchwork Design show in Sao Paola, Brazil and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil to be exhibited side by side with Brazil quilt artists.

The goal of this exhibition is to give United States viewers a chance to see the Brazil and U.S. art quilts in a show, just as Brazilians have been able to do in the past.

There was not an assigned theme so that each artist could continue to work in his or her chosen style or theme. Surprisingly there did appear common themes in the two groups, as artists from both countries explored life, the home, abstract art, and social comment.

 

 

Not Just Fabric & Thread

Pat Kroth, Contemporary Fiber Artist

September 20 - November 5, 2019

Garden Stampede
Like a magpie, I collect and incorporate fabric and found objects with interesting texture, color, or personal significance into my fiber artwork. I am drawn to cast-off, remnant and forgotten materials. My artwork constructions are comprised of layers of materials: hand-dyed and commercial fabrics, yarns, cords, netting, found objects, trapped threads that have been collaged, meticulously and energetically machine stitched or sometimes stapled together to create something new. Often, I think of my work as a playful, random depository for the flotsam and jetsam of life.

Repurposed clothing, candy wrappers, buttons, paperclips, jewelry, toys or other seemingly simple or mundane materials, enhance my work. Music, and or personal experiences often provide the inspiration for my work. Cool jazz on a stormy winter night or perhaps a run or bicycle ride on a hot windy day, family, friends, a good book, a vivid lightning storm - Any of these, all of these can become the catalyst for a new series of explorations. These artworks echo the historical shadows of cloth and fibers from a previous use. I enjoy the playful ambiguity and richness of detail which invites the viewer to come closer, explore and to look further than just the riotous surface of things. These fiber works engage in a colorful conversation about the abundance, role and value of physical objects in our culture.



The National Quilt Museum Collection


The National Quilt Museum's main gallery is made up of quilts from the museum's own collection. Currently, the museum has over 600 quilts in our collection. At any given time, 50-60 of these quilts are on display in the gallery for the public to view. The rest of the collection is housed in our temperature and humidity controlled vault.

Our collection is made up of some of the most extraordinary quilts ever produced. The majority of the quilts in our collection are award winners from regional and national contests. Others have been chosen for a number of different reasons including their uniqueness or their historic relevance. The collection is quite diverse, including quilts of many different styles from quilters throughout the world. If you would like to get information on the collection, the museum produces a collection book with information on each of the quilts. The book is available through our online shop.

How do we choose the quilts for our collection? The museum receives thousands of submissions for collection consideration each year. A collection committee made up of well respected quilters and appraisers makes the final decision on which quilts will ultimately become part of the collection. Only one exception to this process exists. Each year the winning quilts at the AQS Paducah Quilt Show are added to the museum's collection without having to go through the typical process for selection.
We take great pride in the quality and diversity of the museum collection and we will continue to expand it as time goes forward.

 

The museum's collection became available online in partnership with the Alliance for the American Quilt through the Quilt Index. To see all of the museum's quilts, visit www.quiltindex.org.

Selections from the museum's collection are also online on the Google Cultural Institute website.



Oh WOW! Miniature Quilts

Miniature quilts have grown in popularity and sophistication over the past several years. These quilts are made to scale as any size quilt would be; they are simply smaller in scale. As a general rule, to be considered a 'miniature quilt' a quilt must be no more than 24 inches on a side.

The first reaction people have when they see these tiny wonders is "Oh, Wow!" Says National Quilt Museum founder Bill Schroeder, "No better words could describe this remarkable collection of miniature quilts. The more carefully you look at them, the more you will agree."


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